Favorite Audiobooks

For the last few years, I’ve listened to quite a few audiobooks. They’re perfect to listen to before falling asleep or while doing things around the house.

(I’d definitely recommend looking into checking out digital copies from your local library–that’s how I listened to all of the books on this list!)

Here are some of my favorite audiobooks!

ast5-square-4001. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, Narrated by Jim Dale — Jim Dale has a deep, pleasant voice that he uses to create distinct voices for each character. He’s amazing at setting the mood for this magical story, in which the physical setting of a mysterious circus takes on a life of its own. AND he has an English accent! Nothing against American accents (because I, of course, have one), but I’ve (generally) found English voice actors much more pleasant to listen to for long periods of time.

b9hf-square-1536.jpg2. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie, Narrated by Dan Stevens — Okay, so Dan Stevens is the actor who plays Matthew Crawley in Downton Abbey. Firstly, he’s very attractive so it’s kind of fun knowing that he’s reading the book to you. Secondly, he’s so fantastic at his different voices for all the characters that you sometimes forget it’s even him. Thirdly, his accent in general is fantastic. And, come on, Agatha Christie is the queen of mystery, and this is one of her very best. A group of strangers all meet on an island and they mysteriously die one by one. Add all that together and you get hours of edge-of-your-seat entertainment.

b9hi-square-1536.jpg3. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie, Narrated by Dan Stevens — Well, obviously, after listening to And Then There Were None, I just had to listen to another one of Christie’s best novels narrated again by the good ol’ Dan Stevens. A train full of people becomes stranded in the snow as a passenger’s death occurs. The French detective Hercule Poirot is then put on the case to find out who on the train was responsible. Dan Stevens somehow manages a fantastic French accent for Poirot, along with a unique voice for every other character. The whole thing is great and I have a lot of feelings about the brilliant narration.

pride-and-prejudice-audiobook-carolyn-seymour4. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Narrated by Carolyn Seymour — Finally a female voice on my list! (Still British, though…) Listening to this recording was how I first experienced this beloved classic. It was my first Jane Austen novel, and it prompted me to take a fantastic Austen Lit/Film college course. No matter what form you choose, Pride and Prejudice is a must-read classic, especially for the back-and-forth between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. If you have an aversion to classics in general, maybe try listening instead! If done well, a recording can make it a more lively experience.

atjc-square-1536.jpg5. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell, Narrated by Rebecca Lowman & Sunil Malhotra — It’s a whole other kind of awesome listening experience when an audiobook has dual narration! The recording uses a female narrator for Eleanor’s chapters and a male narrator for Park’s. This was the perfect way to absorb the loveliness of this Young Adult Contemporary that quickly earned a spot among my favorites. It’s a story, set in the ’80s, about teenagers Eleanor and Park as they navigate their own lives and find comfort in each other. A sweet, heartfelt, but deals-with-real-issues contemporary.

imgres.jpg6. Crooked House by Agatha Christie, Narrated by Hugh Fraser — Can you tell I love Agatha Christie? Here’s another by an English narrator who has narrated quite a few other Christie novels. Excellent, soothing voice. This story revolves around the sudden death of a wealthy elderly man, and suspicions rest on all those who reside in the mansion. Another twisted, unexpected tale with brilliant narration.


Those are just a few of my favorite audiobooks! I plan to make more lists once I’ve accumulated more favorites.

What are your thoughts on audiobooks? Do you have any recommendations for me?

Thanks for reading! 🙂

xx bits of prose and whimsy

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Priority TBR ’17

One of my reading troubles in 2016 was that, at any given moment, I didn’t have a clear list of my most important books to get to. This problem prompted me to sit back, look at all the books I own, and come up with a list of the ones I want to prioritize this year. I’m not one of those people who will beat herself up over not getting to all of them, but I think it helps to have a clear list of top books to read. Here they are!

mistborn-cover1. The Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson — This series has been recommended to me in person several times and by many Booktubers over the past few years. I’ve heard the world-building and magic system in this high fantasy series are both fantastic. I’ve never read anything by Brandon Sanderson besides a bit of The Rithmatist, so I’m curious whether I’ll fall in love with Sanderson’s books and writing style like so many others have. My goal is to read the first book The Final Empire and decide whether to immediately continue on or wait. This is a definite must-start series!

Bakewell_AttheExistentialistCafe_Final.jpg2. At the Existentialist Café: Freedom, Being, and Apricot Cocktails by Sarah Bakewell — For Christmas ’16, my dad researched and ordered for me a tall stack of well-rated books. Because he found just them for me, I want to read at least one of them this year. This non-fiction book is about Existentialism and features several key Existentialist philosophers. I’ve read and enjoyed Simone de Beauvoir, so I’m looking forward to reading more about her and the other philosophers. And yay to reading more non-fiction!

url3. Getting There: A Book of Memoirs by Gillian Zoe Segal — This is a non-fiction book I’ve mentioned before that a counselor recommended to me and (surprise!) I still haven’t started it. It compiles experience and advice from thirty diverse figures, such as Anderson Cooper and Hans Zimmer, on their roads to success. Maybe I can gather some words of wisdom and inspiration from their stories. It’s been known to happen.

4. imgresThe Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath — I think I’ve related to every quote by Plath I’ve ever read, including many from The Bell Jar. Like this one: “If neurotic is wanting two mutually exclusive things at one and the same time, then I’m neurotic as hell. I’ll be flying back and forth between one mutually exclusive thing and another for the rest of my days.” As with a few other books, maybe it’s the fear of relating too much that’s keeping me away? 2017 may be the perfect year to finally read it.

2ed5c5a2-f1be-4c69-aff9-1585e8e31c2c_1.9e3e3b9a51a94910945e59fa0ac6cd2e.jpeg5. The Tales of Beedle the Bard by JK Rowling — This is purely for fun and one of those “why haven’t I already read this?” books. I own it, it’s by JK Rowling, I love the parts I’ve read/seen in the HP series, and it’s really short. There’s truly no reason not to read it.

Cress-final-e1378337072559.jpg6. Cress by Marissa Meyer — This is the third book in the sci-fi, fairytale-retelling series called The Lunar Chronicles. I read the first two books a couple years ago but haven’t finished the series because, if you’ll recall, I have a weird thing about finishing series/things in general. I’ve pretty much only heard positive things about the rest of the series, so this would be a good one to continue/finish in 2017. (I haven’t decided whether to read Fairest after Cress, so if anyone has strong opinions about it either way, let me know!)

rebecca1.jpg7. Rebecca by Daphne de Murier — One of my close friends recommended this to me, and she’s had a good track record of recommending books that I’ve enjoyed. (Like the Parasol Protectorate series, an entire series I’ve actually finished! Crazy.) I’d like to see how I enjoy the Gothic Romance genre, since I think I’ve read only one other in the genre, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. And we can all use some more literary romance in our lives, right?

9974162ed0cf858575b96ade2b72eebe.jpg8. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz — I’ve heard nothing but good things about this YA contemporary. I’d love to include more diversity into what I read; this story includes racial minorities, as well as an LGBTQ+ romance, and I’m here for it. And the handful of literary rewards all over the book’s cover has got to mean something!

517mlmz7z2l-_sx323_bo1204203200_9. The Sandman, Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes by Neil Gaiman, Sam Kieth, Mike Dringenberg, Malcolm Jones III — As someone who loves both graphic novels and Neil Gaiman, this is one I’ve been wondering about for quite a long time. It looks weird and fantastical and possibly disturbing. Overall, I know very little about it, which is often a good thing, but I’ll be sure to report back with my thoughts!

jk-rowling-cuckoos-calling-sequel-cover-full.jpg10. The Silkworm by JK Rowling — This is the second of Rowling’s Cormoran Strike mystery series, and after thoroughly enjoying the first book The Cuckoo’s Calling last year, I would like to continue the series this year. Mystery has been one of my most-read genres over the past year, and I will always support anything JK Rowling does because she is an absolute gem.

123fffe24deaf92115abe25407ef9788.jpg11. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë — Oh hey, another Gothic Romance novel! This is another classic I’ve heard great things about and I’m entire convinced I’ll enjoy it. And out of the three Brontë sisters, I’ve only read Wuthering Heights by Emily, so I’d love to see how Charlotte’s writing style compares! AND it’s in one of the beautiful clothbound classic editions, so for purely aesthetic reasons I’d love to crack this one open.


Those are my top books to read in 2017! What do you guys think of my list? Are any of these on your TBR? I’d love to hear!

Here’s to a fantastic reading year filled with fantastic books!

xx bits of prose and whimsy

Well, this year happened.

If we’re being completely honest, I’ve had a terrible reading year and a pretty lousy year in general. I’ve found that when things don’t go the way I’d hoped, it helps to analyze why exactly things happened the way they did. So, I’ll lay out some of the reasons why I had a not-so-stellar reading year.

  1. Changing & hating jobs – I had the worst year of jobs I’ve ever had, due mostly to my most recent hellish 6-month-long employment. Being miserable and bored and anxious at work, which turned into being anxious and unhappy after work, did not provide an ideal situation for burning through my TBR. I’m thankful that awful job is behind me and I hope that I’ll be able to recognize red flags for future jobs.
  2. Prioritizing stupid things – I got into the really bad habit of almost always choosing Netflix, or equally mindless pursuits, over reading. It’s not that I think watching TV is always bad, because it’s not. (After all, I’m watching Buffy for the first time and loving it.) But I’ll never get through all the books I want to if I choose watching a TV show over reading 90% of the time.
  3. Politics – Oh hot damn, this took up way too much of my brain space this year. I studied political science in college, so of course politics will always interest me, but my constant need for updates regarding the appalling election season was borderline masochistic. Then the election happened. This added up to my watching the news way too often, stressing about the future of the world, and reading countless articles rather than books.
  4. Not knowing what to read – Usually my to-read list at any particular moment is much more focused than it has been all year. For some reason, I just couldn’t narrow down what I actually wanted to read. I would read something, get through it, not be particularly riveted by it, and then have a hard time committing to my next book. I have about a dozen partially read books that I’m not sure if/when I’ll finish.
  5. Getting behind – This is one of those self-fulfilling prophecies. I would know I was behind in my reading, watching my Goodreads catch-up number get bigger and bigger, and would say “what’s the point? I’m already behind.” Well, this is just dumb. I could have easily narrowed the gap at any given time during the year, but I never did. I have a love-hate relationship with specific goals.

Those are some of the reasons why my reading hasn’t been so great this year, and I’ll be thinking of ways to improve in 2017.

Have you had a good reading year? Let me know! I’d love to hear what things you’ve been struggling with and what’s helped you get past them.

xx bits of prose and whimsy

The TBR Tag

Since my reading life consists mostly of (physical and virtual) piles of books I haven’t read yet, here’s a tag that deals with just that!

(BTW this fun tag was created a while ago by Rachel from A Perfection Called Books and Dana from Dana Square)

How do you keep track of your TBR pile?

I mostly keep track on Goodreads, since it helps me stay pretty organized. And I’m all about virtual organization, even when my real-life organization leaves a lot to be desired.

Is your TBR mostly print or e-book?

My TBR is mostly print, but I do have a couple dozen e-books sitting on my kindle. During my phases of using the libary a lot, I usually check out only e-books, since my alternative is having a stack of physical books racking up late fees once I’ve forgotten that they exist. But, in terms of books I personally own, the majority of them are physical books.

A book that’s been on your TBR list the longest?

imgresWell, apparently the first book I added to my Goodreads TBR list was The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, a classic that I think I would fall in love with based on all the quotes I’ve read by Plath. But I do have other books that have been sitting on my actual shelves for much longer.imgres-1

For instance, Breaking Dawn by Stephanie Meyer has been sitting unread on my shelf since high school. As I’ve said in previous posts, I have a weird problem finishing series (or things in general) so this is another sequel that I’ve never read. (I actually never read the last couple chapters of Eclipse either but shhhhh.)

A book you recently added to your TBRimgres-2

One of the most recent books I’ve added on Goodreads was Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick because she is a delightful human and I need to read more non-fiction, and also memoirs/autobiographies, so this is perfect.

A book on your TBR strictly because of its beautiful cover

imgres-3So, beautiful/interesting covers definitely catch my eye and make me more likely to look into their summaries. For instance, I recently read Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt primarily due to its beautiful cover. Look at it. I mean, come on. (And the story was just as beautiful as its cover. Maybe I’ll write a review at some point.)

imgres-4But as for a book I still haven’t read… Let’s see, I’ll go with The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker. I know very little about this book, but I find the cover very intriguing. I’d say I typically judge more adult novels by their covers, since I don’t hear nearly as much about them compared to young adult books.

A book on your TBR that you never plan on reading

Harry-Potter-and-the-Cursed-Child-poster.jpgOK, gah, well, I might have to say Harry Potter and the Cursed Child… I’m not completely ruling out reading it, but right now I honestly have no desire to. As a huge HP fan, I’m worried by the things I’ve heard from people who have read it. I don’t want the story, which is not even written by JK Rowling, to change the way I feel about the characters I grew up with. Idk. If anyone has any strong feelings about it either way, I’d love to hear them!

An unpublished book on your TBR that you’re excited for

Vengeful by V. E. Schwab AKA the sequel to Vicious!! As far as I can tell, this has zero info as to the plot or release date, but I’m very pumped for it! Vicious held the #2 spot on my 2015 favorite books! I’m not usually one of those people to read new books right when they’re released, but I predict that this will be an exception. ALSO, whenever John Green publishes another book, which will hopefully happen eventually, I will be all over that.

A book on your TBR that basically everyone’s read but you

I’m gonna have to go with all the books from The Mortal Instruments series or The Infernal Devices series, both by Cassandra Clare.

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infernal-devices-covers1.pngPretty much everyone I know has read one or more books from these series, and then here I am having read zero. I’m not really itching to start (even though I watch and enjoy the Shadowhunters TV series), but The Infernal Devices sound more interesting to me. I don’t know. I’d appreciate any thoughts about these series in particular and on whether they’re worth reading.

A book on your TBR that everyone recommends to you

mistborn-cover.jpgSo, I don’t have a book that I’m recommended all the time, but I definitely have had several people encourage me to read The Mistborn Trilogy, a high fantasy series by Brandon Sanderson. And I own them in e-book and physical copies. So I don’t know what’s stopping me…517mlmz7z2l-_sx323_bo1204203200_

I’ve also been told to read the Sandman graphic novel series by Neil Gaiman a handful of times when I tell people I’m into graphic novels, so this really needs to happen. Especially since I own the first one. So yeah, I’ll start it eventually…

A book on your TBR that you’re dying to read

urlI don’t know that I’m “dying to read” this, but I know I really need to read Getting There: A Book of Memoirs by Gillian Zoe Segal. It’s a collection of memoirs by semi-famous, successful people about how they got to where they are now. My counselor recommended it to me, so I’m planning to start reading it very soon.

How many books are on your Goodreads TBR shelf?

There are 625 books on my TBR shelf. I consistently add and periodically remove books, so this is pretty much ever-changing. But, yeah, a lot of books sound interesting to me. We’ll see how many I get to!


I know this tag has been going around for a long time, but feel free to do it if you haven’t already! I had a lot of fun with it. 🙂 Let me know if you have any thoughts on the books I mentioned or some books on your TBR that you’ve been putting off!

Thanks for reading!

xx bits of prose and whimsy

Halloween Book Tag

I love this time of year, so I’m doing this Halloween-themed book tag that I’ve seen all over the place! Once again, I don’t actually follow the rules of tagging or being tagged, but consider yourself tagged if you’re reading this!

halloween-05

CARVING PUMPKINS: What book would you carve up and light on fire?

It’s not likely that I would actually destroy a book, but I’ll choose one I really didn’t like: Lock and Key by Sarah Dessen. This is the first Sarah Dessen book I’ve read and probably my last. I found literally nothing remarkable about this contemporary story. Kind of pointless.

TRICK OR TREAT: What character is a trick? What character is a treat?

Trick: Amy Dunne from Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. She’s the definition of tricky.

Treat: Alexia Tarabotti from the Parasol Protectorate series by Gail Carriger. She’s always a delight to read about. Spunky, smart, and confident.

CANDY CORN: What’s a book that’s always sweet?

Attachments by Rainbow Rowell. This ’90s rom-com style novel is the definition of sweet and a great pick-me-up. A cute love story with endearing characters.

GHOST: What character would you love to visit you as a ghost?

Albus Dumbledore! I’d love for him to visit and give me some words of wisdom. And, let’s be honest, he’s just dang cool.

DRESSING UP IN COSTUME: What character would you want to be for a day?

I’ll go with Luna Lovegood from Harry Potter. I would have magical abilities, attend Hogwarts, be friends with the Golden Trio plus Ginny, and could act as weird as I wanted without raising any eyebrows. Sounds like a fun day to me!

WIZARDS AND WITCHES: What is your favorite Harry Potter moment?

It’s impossible for me to choose a favorite… I’ve always loved the beginning of Order of the Phoenix when Harry meets members of the Order and is whisked away to 12 Grimmauld Place. So I’ll just go with that.

BLOOD AND GORE: What book was so creepy you had to take a break from it?

One of the creepiest/most disturbing things I’ve read is the Locke & Key series by Joe Hill. It’s a fantastic series of graphic novels about an old mansion with a set of mysterious keys. I never had to take a break from it, but there were plenty of creepy moments.


Thanks for reading & Happy Halloween!

xx bits of prose and whimsy

Reading Goals ’16 check-in

With the 5th month of the year halfway over (TIME, WHAT?), let’s see how I’m doing with my 2016 Reading Goals!

  1. Read 65 books — Okay, so, according to Goodreads, I’ve read a total of 12 books so far this year. Also according to Goodreads, I’m 12 books behind schedule. Am I embarrassed? A little. I’m not super proud of my current reading habits. I’m currently part-of-the-way through a handful of books, and have about a dozen books checked out from the library, so I will attempt to narrow that gap in the coming weeks. (Key word: attempt.)
  2. Read 8 classics — I’ve been stagnant for months on an audiobook of Agatha Christie short stories, so I need to check it out again from the library and finish it. Other than that… Some of my next possible reads are: Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith, Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfield, The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, and several Agatha Christie mysteries I’ve snatched (with full permission) from my dad’s library. I honestly have so many classics to choose from, but, for some reason, they’re never high on my TBR.
  3. Reread the Harry Potter series — Yeahhhh no. Haven’t done this. I honestly don’t foresee myself reading the whole series, but I will absolutely try to reread the first 2 or 3 books by the end of the year.
  4. Finish 5 series I’ve already started — So, I’m almost done with the Parasol Protectorate series by Gail Carriger! I’m on book 4 of 5 at the moment. Other than that… I’ve read 2 out of 5 books of the Fablehaven series by Brandon Mull and started the 3rd a few months ago. I haven’t really been in the mood for it as of late, but it would certainly be possible to finish this series in the near-ish future. As I’ve mentioned previously, book series are typically my kryptonite, so I have probably a dozen other series that I’ve started but haven’t finished. A few are: The Hunger Games trilogy, of which I’ve read 2.5 books; The Darkest Minds trilogy, with 1 out of 3 read; The Lunar Chronicles series, with 2 out of 4 (arguably more than 4 with the novellas) read; and, brace yourselves, Twilight, having read the first 2 books, 80% of Eclipse, and none of Breaking Dawn. *[cue deep male, possibly British, voice] Will Wendy ever relive her early high school years by rereading and finishing Twilight? Stay tuned to find out on this season of Bits of Prose and Whimsy*
  5. Read 3 non-fiction books — So I’m currently reading Bossypants by Tina Fey, and finishing it will get me 1/3 of the way through this goal! And I have a bunch more on my TBR, so this will definitely happen. YAY.

Well, it’s been real. Clearly I’m not burning it up in 2016, but I’m not completely failing. Only mostly.

How is it going reaching your goals? Does anyone else have trouble with finishing series? Classics recommendations?

Thanks for reading!

Book Haul: Jan-April ’16

It’s Book Haul Time!

I don’t know about you, but I always enjoy seeing what books have caught people’s eyes enough to purchase. So here are the books I’ve acquired so far this year!

(Books 1-5 are from Owlcrate boxes. Maybe I’ll do an unboxing or discussion post at some point.)

  1. Flawed by Cecelia Ahern — This one is from the most recent (April) box. It’s the first installment of a YA dystopian series, and it has pretty solid ratings on goodreads. It’s not high up on my TBR, but I’ll definitely give it a try when I’m in the mood for a dystopian. It does sound like quite a few other dystopian series–girl going with grain, then going against it, trouble ensues–but I’m sure it’ll still be enjoyable since I haven’t read a dystopian in so long.
  2. The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner — This is a YA contemporary with excellent reviews. It honestly doesn’t sound like anything else I’ve read, centering around 3 high school seniors living in a rural town and dealing with all that goes into living in a conservative, small town. This is definitely a book I’ll consider during the summer months when I typically read more contemporary stories.
  3. The Love That Split the World by Emily Henry — This is a YA Romance Sci-fi book that sounds pretty freaking cool. I mean, it’s a love story with premonitions and time travel. Come on. It has somewhat mixed reviews on goodreads, but I’m convinced I’ll enjoy this one.
  4. The Time Machine by H.G. Wells — This one came with The Love That Split the World in the sci-fi themed Owlcrate box. It’s a gosh-darn beautiful cover, and I’ve never read this classic. It’s pretty short and I’ve heard good things.
  5. Worlds of Ink and Shadow by Lena Coakley — This YA historical fiction novel doesn’t have the best reviews on goodreads (which I take into account 95% of the time when choosing what to read) so I’m not sure when I’ll actually read this. The concept does sound pretty cool; it’s a fictionalized account of the Bronte sisters. I’ve read Wuthering Heights by Charlotte Bronte, and even though it was extremely melancholic (even for my taste) I did rather enjoy it. So we’ll see about this one.
  6. Making Comics by Scott McCloud — I don’t know if I’ve talked about this much, but I’m pretty into drawing. I have a vague dream of writing and illustrating children’s books, and another where I write and draw my own comics. Hence the book about comics.
  7. Giant Days, Vol. 1 by John Allison, Lissa Treiman, & Whitney Cogar — A comic about 3 best friends in college. The art style is right up my alley and I bet the story will be endearing. Definitely one of the next graphic novels I’ll read.
  8. Rat Queens, Vol. 3 by Kurtis J. Wiebe, Tamra Bonvillain, & Tess Fowler — The third installment in a graphic novel series about kick-ass ladies in a fantasy world. According to some reviews, it looks like the art style has changed quite a bit, so that’s disappointing. But still looking forward this one.
  9. Saga, Vol. 4 and
  10. Saga, Vol. 5 by Brian K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples — I snagged both of these along with Rat Queens for an Image Comics sale at B&N. Admittedly, I’ve only read volume 1 so far, but I’m pretty convinced that I’ll continue to love the series. (I already owned 1, 2 & 3).
  11. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf — I finally visited a used bookstore after passing it everyday to & from work for months, and I snagged this copy of a classic I’ve yet to read. I know I read A Room of One’s Own in college(?) and enjoyed it, and I’ve heard great things about Woolf in general, so this is another classic to add to my growing collection of books I’ll eventually feel guilty about not picking up yet. Oops?
  12. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier — A close friend recommended this to me, convinced I’ll love it. She hasn’t let me down with her recommendations thus far, so I’m pretty sure this’ll be another winner. I need more Gothic Romance in my life.
  13. Bossypants by Tina Fey — Two close friends and I decided to start a book club (though we haven’t actually discussed the book yet on any of our coffee dates) and this was our first pick. I haven’t read enough to offer a fully-formed opinion, but I’m thoroughly enjoying it so far. It’s very pleasantly Tina Fey-esque in all the best ways. Maybe I’ll write a review once I’m done? Maybe.
  14. Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders by Neil Gaiman — It would be the surprise of the century if I ended up disliking this, being the Gaiman-obsessed person that I am. His writing is magical.
  15. Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin — This was the second of two books that I picked up at that used bookstore. It was a bit of a spontaneous buy, but I did thoroughly enjoy Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac by the same author, so I’m looking forward to this one. The plot sounds pretty darn interesting. There’s a girl who dies, ends up in a place called “Elsewhere” and she’s now aging backwards. Stories involving different after-life scenarios can be very cool. Stoked.

I’d absolutely appreciate any thoughts on these books, maybe which ones I should push to the top of my list! Thanks for reading 🙂