Favorite Audiobooks

For the last few years, I’ve listened to quite a few audiobooks. They’re perfect to listen to before falling asleep or while doing things around the house.

(I’d definitely recommend looking into checking out digital copies from your local library–that’s how I listened to all of the books on this list!)

Here are some of my favorite audiobooks!

ast5-square-4001. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, Narrated by Jim Dale — Jim Dale has a deep, pleasant voice that he uses to create distinct voices for each character. He’s amazing at setting the mood for this magical story, in which the physical setting of a mysterious circus takes on a life of its own. AND he has an English accent! Nothing against American accents (because I, of course, have one), but I’ve (generally) found English voice actors much more pleasant to listen to for long periods of time.

b9hf-square-1536.jpg2. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie, Narrated by Dan Stevens — Okay, so Dan Stevens is the actor who plays Matthew Crawley in Downton Abbey. Firstly, he’s very attractive so it’s kind of fun knowing that he’s reading the book to you. Secondly, he’s so fantastic at his different voices for all the characters that you sometimes forget it’s even him. Thirdly, his accent in general is fantastic. And, come on, Agatha Christie is the queen of mystery, and this is one of her very best. A group of strangers all meet on an island and they mysteriously die one by one. Add all that together and you get hours of edge-of-your-seat entertainment.

b9hi-square-1536.jpg3. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie, Narrated by Dan Stevens — Well, obviously, after listening to And Then There Were None, I just had to listen to another one of Christie’s best novels narrated again by the good ol’ Dan Stevens. A train full of people becomes stranded in the snow as a passenger’s death occurs. The French detective Hercule Poirot is then put on the case to find out who on the train was responsible. Dan Stevens somehow manages a fantastic French accent for Poirot, along with a unique voice for every other character. The whole thing is great and I have a lot of feelings about the brilliant narration.

pride-and-prejudice-audiobook-carolyn-seymour4. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Narrated by Carolyn Seymour — Finally a female voice on my list! (Still British, though…) Listening to this recording was how I first experienced this beloved classic. It was my first Jane Austen novel, and it prompted me to take a fantastic Austen Lit/Film college course. No matter what form you choose, Pride and Prejudice is a must-read classic, especially for the back-and-forth between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. If you have an aversion to classics in general, maybe try listening instead! If done well, a recording can make it a more lively experience.

atjc-square-1536.jpg5. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell, Narrated by Rebecca Lowman & Sunil Malhotra — It’s a whole other kind of awesome listening experience when an audiobook has dual narration! The recording uses a female narrator for Eleanor’s chapters and a male narrator for Park’s. This was the perfect way to absorb the loveliness of this Young Adult Contemporary that quickly earned a spot among my favorites. It’s a story, set in the ’80s, about teenagers Eleanor and Park as they navigate their own lives and find comfort in each other. A sweet, heartfelt, but deals-with-real-issues contemporary.

imgres.jpg6. Crooked House by Agatha Christie, Narrated by Hugh Fraser — Can you tell I love Agatha Christie? Here’s another by an English narrator who has narrated quite a few other Christie novels. Excellent, soothing voice. This story revolves around the sudden death of a wealthy elderly man, and suspicions rest on all those who reside in the mansion. Another twisted, unexpected tale with brilliant narration.


Those are just a few of my favorite audiobooks! I plan to make more lists once I’ve accumulated more favorites.

What are your thoughts on audiobooks? Do you have any recommendations for me?

Thanks for reading! 🙂

xx bits of prose and whimsy

Oh, hello! A look back at 2015.

So, my whole blog-more-in-2015 goal didn’t happen at all… (unless you count my tumblr, which we won’t.) I’ll definitely be blogging more consistently in the months to come!

A huge part of my year was figuring out what my post-grad life was going to look like. It’s a major shift after graduating college and getting out into the work force. I was intimidated and confused about what exactly to do. Finding jobs and working inevitably became a major part of my personal growth.

A few months into the year, I got a retail job at the mall. This experience taught me a few things:

  1. People can be wonderful, coworkers and customers alike.
  2. Management can be really, really terrible and make everyone hate coming to work.
  3. Retail is exhausting, especially for introverts. But it does get easier!
  4. Liking who you work with is super duper important.
  5. Being overqualified for a job will eventually become frustrating.
  6. It’s pretty awesome to meet and make friends with people you never would have met otherwise.
  7. Some customers will be rude no matter what you do. Just be as friendly as necessary, then vent to your coworkers and laugh off the experience.

In August, I quit my retail job and began working for an early literacy program in elementary schools. It definitely has its ups and downs, but at least it feels rewarding the majority of the time. I’ve learned a lot from this job as well:

  1. There are a lot of kind people out there who will brighten your day.
  2. Listening and talking through people’s concerns is really important.
  3. Helping kids learn to read can sometimes be frustrating, but it’s exciting and rewarding to see their progress.
  4. Some days kids will be crazy, but most days they’re really sweet. They’re also hilarious.
  5. It’s crucial to be verbally recognized for your strengths and accomplishments. Feeling under-appreciated will only make you bitter and frustrated.
  6. Your coworkers can become some of your closest friends.
  7. There isn’t a direct career path. Some meandering is healthy and valuable.
  8. Planning for the future will likely make you more content in the present.

This year has been a transitional one, and it’s definitely had its high and low points, but through them I’ve learned a lot about myself and what I want. ‘Adulting’ will continue to be a process, but that’s okay. Every young adult that I know feels the same way about adulthood, but I think we’re all still having some fun despite it all. It’s a wild ride, but I’m pretty happy with all the changes that I’ve made this year.

Thanks for reading my bits of prose and whimsy! x

Look for my next post, which will be about my top books of the year! 🙂